Zoom-Out Mantras

Words are powerful and literally shape our reality.

Mantras are short phrases that we can use as tools to focus our minds on a particular perspective or meta-perspective and remind us of what matters.

The word mantra originates from Sanskrit meaning a “sacred message or text, charm, spell, counsel.”

Mantras are a great way to harness the “magick” of words and the power of perspective.

Many of these mantras are famous quotes from wise people. Others are original mantras of Zoom-Out, such as this first one:

“Zoom-Out to find the most helpful perspective”

– The Zoom-Out MOTTO

“Reality is plural”

– Robert Anton Wilson

“All perspectives are wrong but some are helpful”

– Zoom-Out SIGNPOST

“We don’t see things as they are; we see them as we are”

Anaïs Nin

“Default perspectives can be overridden”

– Zoom-Out SIGNPOST

“There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so.”

– Shakespeare’s Hamlet

“The whole is more than the sum of its parts”

– Zoom-Out SIGNPOST (Aristotle)

“See things in the right proportions”

– Corrie Ten Boom
Corrie Ten Boom

Full quote: Child, you have to learn to see things in the right proportions.
Learn to see great things great and small things small.”

“When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change”

– Wayne Dyer

“Attention control is power”

– Zoom-Out SIGNPOST

“We are what we think.”

– The Buddha, 563 – 483 BC
Buddha

Full quote: “We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts, we make the world.”

“The map is not the territory”

– Alfred Korzybski, 1933

“What we see depends mainly on what we look for.”

― John Lubbock

“The reason we suffer is we don’t see the world clearly”

– The Buddha, 563 – 483 BC
Buddha

“We suffer more in imagination than in reality”

– Seneca, Stoic philosopher

“Strong opinions, weakly held”

– Paul Saffo
perspective on events

“Comparison is the thief of joy”

– Theodore Roosevelt

“Happiness is reality minus expectations “

– Theodore Roosevelt

“We have two ears and one mouth so that we can listen twice as much as we speak.”

– Epictetus, Stoic philosopher, A.D. 55 – 135

See also the Zoom-Out quotes.